Job ads increasing for the first time this year

In a recent update by Jobs and Skills Australia, online job ads experienced a modest rise of 0.2% in March, marking the first increase since December. The report, which provides insights into the current state of the job market, revealed that this uptick translated to 400 additional ads, bringing the total to 249,000 ads listed actively throughout Australia.

 

Despite a year-on-year decline of 12.4%, equivalent to 35,300 ads, the overall job ad volume remains historically high, suggesting continued robustness in the market.

 

Breaking down the data, recruitment activity surged in four major occupation groups during March. Community and personal service workers saw the most significant rise, up by 3.0%, totalling 830 ads. This was closely followed by machinery operators and drivers, which experienced a 2.5% increase, equivalent to 320 ads.

 

However, not all sectors saw growth. Professionals faced the biggest decline, down by 1.2%, representing 880 ads, followed by technicians and trades workers, which saw a 1.1% drop, amounting to 380 ads.

 

Geographically, the rise in job ads was widespread, with most regions experiencing growth in March. However, Queensland saw no significant change, while the Northern Territory and Tasmania witnessed slight declines of 0.9% and 0.1%, respectively.

 

The report highlighted that metropolitan Australia accounted for the majority of recruitment activity, with 71.5% of job ads posted in capital cities. Interestingly, there was a noted decline in both regional areas and capital cities, down by 8.0% and 9.9% year-on-year, respectively.

 

This data provides valuable insights for both job seekers and employers, indicating the current trends and dynamics within the Australian job market. With signs of recovery and growth in certain sectors, individuals and businesses can make informed decisions to navigate the evolving landscape of employment opportunities.

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